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There’s something about the color pink that makes me feel calm. I think it’s because I often associate it with the cherry blossoms, which look almost like pink clouds on land. When I think about pink, I think about softness and beauty, two qualities exemplified by the delicate nature of the cherry blossom.  Cherry Blossom Pink for Bedrooms Shades of pink are perfect for bedrooms or personal, quiet spaces. It’s ideal for inducing serenity in an intimate space where you can simply lie down, meditate, or relax. I can also imagine it being used in nurseries for babies (yes, that includes male babies), as the color also emanates a sense of innocence and joy.  While the color pink is traditionally “feminine,” I don’t believe that colors should be segregated by gender, as they evoke pure emotion, which are human traits that transcend our physicality. Don’t be afraid to use pink…

The first capsule hotels of Japan were originally targeted towards businessmen who burned the midnight oil and missed the last bus or train back home. Instead of staying in pricey hotels, or worse, sleeping out on the streets, capsule hotels offered these tired businessmen an affordable place to stay for the night. Although they are designed to be very compact, all the essentials of an overnight stay are provided. For my recent trip to Kyoto, a friend and I managed to book capsules at 9h nine hours, a capsule hotel located at the historic and bustling district of Gion. Listed down below are four reasons why you shouldn’t shy away from this peculiar hotel during your next visit to Japan! 1. It’s affordable. Japan is no cheap country to travel to. And if you’re there to sightsee rather than do a staycation, the last thing you want to spend money…

The Imperial Palace in the Chiyoda district is one place that is quite overlooked in favor of places like Ginza, Akihabara, and Tokyo DisneySea, but it is a hidden gem that is closed off to most visitors unless you join a private tour. It is the current residence of the Imperial Family so only a few areas are open to the public. The palace grounds are perfect for both history and nature lovers since the area features relics from a bygone age and a beautifully designed garden. You can see remnants of the old palace such as the watchtowers and the moats, the more recent buildings like the Imperial Household Agency Building and the Chōwaden Reception Hall, and the East Garden that sprawls over 2,300,000 square feet (210,000 square meters). The area used to be a part of the Edo Castle built by a samurai named Ōta Dōkan in 1457; the land became…

Vermillion, ruby, scarlet, cerise, maroon, red—it’s everywhere. From the intricate floral hair ornaments and beautiful ornate robes of the passing geishas and maikos, to the pocket-sized omamori or lucky charms being sold inside the temples. Red is a recurring color in the old capital of Japan, Kyoto. Most notably, though, is the fiery red of Kyoto temples’ torii gates. What are these “torii gates” anyway? Torii gates are markers that set the boundary from the profane everyday world, to the sacred world of the “kami” or Shinto gods. They mark the entrance into a sanctified space. They are usually made out of either wood or concrete, and are painted orangey-red to jet black. In Chinese culture, red is a symbol for luck. In Japanese religion though, there is no clear explanation on why most torii gates are painted a bright, flaming red hue. One school of thought, however, says that the color…