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It’s such a treat to go to high-end shops like Kuysen and wander around to see the luxury furniture brands they carry, like Zanotta, to name one. The magnificence of the designs, the materials used, and the melding of both to create furniture which is both functional and beautiful, make you want to bring them home. If you can afford it, good for you. If you can’t, don’t sweat it, just breathe in that luxury and dream on. In the video, you will see tables, chairs, armchairs and sofas designed by Carlo Mollino, Federica Capitani, Ora Ito, Damian Williamson, and Frank Rettenbacher. Perfect Walls for Luxury Furniture If you do get to bring home these high-end furniture, you would need your home to be ready to receive these masterpieces. For your walls, there is Virtuoso, Boysen’s luxury line that has a silky, matte finish which is the perfect backdrop because it…

When it comes to furniture and industrial design, Denmark is at the top of my list. Innovation, practicality, minimalism, and sustainability are some qualities that characterize Danish design. There is a museum in Copenhagen called the Designmuseum Danmark (literally translates to English as “Design Museum Denmark”) that showcases the best of Danish craftsmanship, mostly spanning from the last century until now. The museum is well curated and features furniture, clothing, and graphic design among others. Only a few pieces of the museum are interactive, such as the chairs in the lobby which you are allowed to sit on. The Danes know how to create things that are both practical and stylish at the same time. Danish designers know how to incorporate their personal design aesthetics with the comfort and usability of the product. Despite being avant-garde, Danish design also leans towards minimalism. Reinventing the basic form is prioritized instead of…

Radisson Blu Royal Hotel, opened in 1960 and considered to be one of Arne Jacobsen’s most iconic projects, is a metallic, rectangular tower seemingly out of place, jutting out among the low-lying buildings of Copenhagen. This building is designed by Arne Jacobsen, one of the most prominent Danish designers from the 20th Century, known mostly for his distinctive chair designs. Although the hotel has changed throughout the past decades, it has still retained its modernist, retro aesthetic to this day. The hotel’s façade, in addition to the furniture of the hotel, were designed by Jacobsen. The famous Egg chairs and Swan chairs can be found in the lobby, and the spiral staircase on the ground floor has been preserved since the 60s. The only part of the hotel that has been unchanged and left in its original design is room 606, the hotel’s most popular room. The second floor of…

Dover Street Market is more than just a concept-store, it is a space for artistic eclecticism. What sets Dover Street Market apart from most department stores is the unrestrained creativity it harbors. Art installations are displayed alongside designer clothing making it seem more like an art gallery than a boutique. The store is described by its owner, Rei Kawakubo – the designer behind Comme des Garçons – as an “ongoing atmosphere of beautiful chaos,” and this impression becomes clear as soon as you step into the store. Previously the Komatsu Department Store from 1946, this revamped six-story building is a blank canvas for creatives to exhibit their work. Without the clothing racks and the artworks, the building would only be comprised of empty white rooms. All of the artists displaying their work inside Dover Street Market were picked by Kawakubo herself. Among the installations are “Pulse” by Kyoto-based Kohei Nawa,…

Issey Miyake doesn’t consider himself solely as a fashion designer. True enough, Miyake’s work encompasses various fields of design. His contributions to design don’t come from his concepts and ideas alone, but also in his innovative use of textiles and materials. Miyake’s design philosophy lies in the principle of a “‘Piece of Cloth,’ a concept which explores not only the relationship between the body and clothing, but also the space that is born between them.” He constantly experimented on the way the clothes moved in relation to the human body. The silhouettes of his clothing can often shape the wearer or be shaped by the wearer. Some pieces have drapey silhouettes with fluid fabrics that bounce, crease, or stretch depending on the wearer, making each piece look different on various body types; some take on the shapes of cocoons or thorns  (among other things), and can be further manipulated depending…

As environmental degradation becomes more alarming, sustainability should no longer be a trend but a need. Sustainability is a lifestyle which includes the food you eat, the clothes you wear, the things you buy, and the little habits in everyday life. We live in a world of rampant consumerism, and this is madness. Big businesses like to sell their products cheap, prompting people to buy more. Little  do we  know that these companies may use inexpensive, toxic materials and exploit cheap labor in order to bring down production costs. Even though there is an increasing awareness towards sustainability, there are still certain biases against sustainable materials. Some people believe that materials like recycled fabric and reclaimed wood are ugly or gross, and they would demand products that are made out of virgin materials. But thanks to new technologies and innovative artists, the tide is turning and sustainable design can be just as good, aesthetically…

Up until I was 21, I lived in my grandparents’ ancestral home. It was a late 50s/60s bungalow with huge, flower-filled gardens and enough space to accommodate four generations under one roof. While I have only a few memories of my grandparents before they passed away, living in the same rooms, sitting on the same furniture, and seeing little reminders of them every day made me feel connected to them. But it was never really my own room or home—it was someone else’s. Building A New Home While I was in college, my parents decided to move out of the ancestral home and build a new house. It was a long and arduous process from finding a village that was safe, accessible, and had the right atmosphere, to planning the house and going through every little detail. Even I don’t remember much of the construction now! Building the house literally…

Take a look around: at the tumbler keeping your coffee warm, the chair you’re sitting on, the room you’re in, the screen of this strange device you’ve been staring at the past few seconds. Someone, somewhere out there has either made your life ten times easier or noticeably less enjoyable (to my desk and chair at home, my stiff neck sends its regards), all thanks to design. The most obvious examples are those we barely give a second glance. Take the humble paper clip, a common detail in everyday life that usually never merits a second glance. But the reason people are still using it today since its birth sometime in the 19th century is it does what it’s supposed to do in the easiest, most straightforward way possible. Another example is door knobs. Imagine carrying a heavy stack of boxes and trying to open a door with a round,…