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Justin Gabriel Chua

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“Wait for us!” I helplessly called out to my younger cousins who were already lost in the maze of colorful blocks, which, up until then, they had only seen on iPad screens while playing Minecraft. Who could blame them for being so eager? Against the pale whites of the mall’s walls and floors, the vibrant fortress that was the Boysen Mix and Match Color Play set-up drew kids and grown-ups alike into a playground of blocks and paint, a free-of-charge opportunity to have some fun and to showcase creativity. A post shared by Boysen Paints Philippines (@boysenpaintsphilippines) on May 30, 2017 at 9:53pm PDT Awaken the Child Walking into the color maze, you’ll find large glass cubes filled with shapes of different colors; once you’ve chosen four, you’ll be lead into an open space with stations of paints and brushes at your disposal. If you’re looking for a way for…

No, you did not read that wrong; to many around the world, it’s not uncommon for milk and cereal to taste like the color blue, for the word “college” to taste like sausage, or for a person’s name to be the color violet. This unusual pairing of the senses is called synesthesia, and affects around four percent of the entire population. While it might sound like a random, useless quirk of nature, the study of this unusual trait sheds some light on how closely we associate our senses with one another, and may even teach us a thing or two about how we can use color to boost memory and spark up some creativity. How it Works Synesthesia literally means “joint sensation”; as one sense is activated, another sense is triggered to complement it. Take for example graphemes, one of the most common forms of synesthesia. Here, written elements such…