Author

Kai Lauridsen

Browsing

There’s something about the color pink that makes me feel calm. I think it’s because I often associate it with the cherry blossoms, which look almost like pink clouds on land. When I think about pink, I think about softness and beauty, two qualities exemplified by the delicate nature of the cherry blossom.  Cherry Blossom Pink for Bedrooms Shades of pink are perfect for bedrooms or personal, quiet spaces. It’s ideal for inducing serenity in an intimate space where you can simply lie down, meditate, or relax. I can also imagine it being used in nurseries for babies (yes, that includes male babies), as the color also emanates a sense of innocence and joy.  While the color pink is traditionally “feminine,” I don’t believe that colors should be segregated by gender, as they evoke pure emotion, which are human traits that transcend our physicality. Don’t be afraid to use pink…

Minimalism is a trend that has yet to influence living spaces. Space is a resource that is sometimes overlooked in sustainable architecture. Life quality decreases as population density increases since pollution levels rise, population goes out of hand, and resources become more expensive. Many of us in the Philippines are experiencing these effects firsthand. Manila is one of the most densely populated cities in the world. According to the Philippine Statistics Authority, the capital region had a population of 12.9 million people in 2015, inhabiting an area of 620 square kilometers – that’s around 21,000 people per square kilometer. In the same year, New York had a population of 8.5 million people living in a 784 square kilometer area, or about 11,000 people per square kilometer.  This means that Manila is nearly twice as densely populated as New York City, the most crowded city in the United States. Other cities…

Frank Gehry at a Glance Name: Frank Owen Gehry Date of Birth: February 28, 1929 Place of Birth: Toronto, Canada Design Signature:    Deconstructivism – an architectural style with a deliberately chaotic outcome    Fluidity – expressed in the use of metallic folds in multiple buildings    Asymmetry – his buildings defy the convention of rigid structure and often look warped Signature Material: Corrugated metal Frank Owen Gehry is a Canadian-born American architect is one of the world’s most notable architects. He was awarded the Pritzker Architecture Prize in 1989, with the jury citing the following, “Always open to experimentation, he has as well a sureness and maturity that resists, in the same way that Picasso did, being bound either by critical acceptance or his successes. His buildings are juxtaposed collages of spaces and materials that make users appreciative of both the theatre and the back-stage, simultaneously revealed.” Frank Gehry’s Iconic…

Imagine if you were colorblind and you were not able to see the colors around you the way most people do. Imagine if you could not distinguish violet, lavender and purple because they just look like different shades of blue, or if you confuse red with black or dark grey. Color blindness is a condition that prevents people from seeing color the way everybody else does. Around eight percent of males and less than one percent of females are estimated to be colorblind. How would this affect daily life? Think of driving and having to find a method to “read” traffic lights, or finding it hard to know if a fruit is ripe or not, or having to navigate this handicap if you want to be a fashion or interior designer, an artist, a policeman, or a pilot who has to maneuver a plane using complex cockpit instruments. Visible light…

The golden ratio is a ratio found in nature that somehow makes an object aesthetically appealing. Artists throughout history such as Salvador Dali and Leonardo Da Vinci attempted to create works based on this proportion in order to make them look beautiful. This ratio has also been applied into architecture for centuries, such as the Great Pyramid of Giza. In architecture, this ratio is applicable through the use of rational spacing. Incredible precision and a particular allotment of space can unconsciously create a big difference to one’s perception. This does not only hold true to length and width of a building’s foundation, but it’s applicable to the structure’s height as well. In order to achieve the “perfect” proportion, all these forms of measurement must be taken into consideration. You also see this in everyday design, especially those that incorporate curving silhouettes such as spiral staircases. A common piece of furniture…

As the population continues to grow and our resources become more scarce, the only rational way to solve this crisis is by living more sustainably. Most people nowadays are situated in urban areas which are predominantly manmade, disconnecting us from the natural environment. The Ayala Museum is holding an exhibit on Living Architecture, which they described as an approach that helps re-integrate our manmade structures back to nature. The movement began in the 20th Century and is currently flourishing, thanks to the technological innovations we have made in the past few decades. “ORGANIC ARCHITECTURE” Architects in the early 20th Century wanted to redefine the concept of buildings. Rather than creating boring cubic structures, architects in this era began taking inspiration from the natural world. Frank Lloyd Wright Fallingwater is a residential family home in Pennsylvania built in the 1930’s. Wright set the house on top of a natural waterfall, incorporating…

Hygge is an integral part of Scandinavian culture that doesn’t have a direct translation in English. Loosely translated from Danish as “cosiness,” hygge is a cultural concept that doesn’t only describe the atmosphere of a place. It is also a state of mind when you feel comfortable, warm, and content, especially when you’re with a group of close friends or family members. In addition to company, the setting of a place is also a contributor to hygge, and you will notice that most (if not all) homes in Scandinavia are designed to feel hygge. While the concept evolved from a need to survive the cold, dark Nordic winters, I don’t consider it to be exclusive to temperate climates. There are ways to feel comfortable and “warm” despite the hot and muggy weather in the tropics. Some elements can still be used in tropical climates while others should be omitted altogether…

Copenhagen is the capital of New Nordic cuisine, known for its use of fresh, local, seasonal ingredients. Everyday ingredients like radishes, peas, and apples are prepared in unexpected ways and incorporated together with seafood and meat to create dishes that are both healthy and unbelievably flavorful. The meticulous presentation also assures that the dishes are as good as they look, and each dish looks somewhat like a piece of abstract art. Feast your eyes on the these color palettes found in the following dishes. Monochromatic The colour green is almost omnipresent in New Nordic cuisine due to their regular use of vegetables (more so during the summer). The two dishes that fall under this category are the green strawberry tart, raw strawberries with a biscuit-like crust, and the buttermilk & chervil, a sorbet-like dish with chervil sprinkled above. Vegetables and fruits are so fresh in Scandinavia that sometimes, a single…

When it comes to furniture and industrial design, Denmark is at the top of my list. Innovation, practicality, minimalism, and sustainability are some qualities that characterize Danish design. There is a museum in Copenhagen called the Designmuseum Danmark (literally translates to English as “Design Museum Denmark”) that showcases the best of Danish craftsmanship, mostly spanning from the last century until now. The museum is well curated and features furniture, clothing, and graphic design among others. Only a few pieces of the museum are interactive, such as the chairs in the lobby which you are allowed to sit on. The Danes know how to create things that are both practical and stylish at the same time. Danish designers know how to incorporate their personal design aesthetics with the comfort and usability of the product. Despite being avant-garde, Danish design also leans towards minimalism. Reinventing the basic form is prioritized instead of…

Radisson Blu Royal Hotel, opened in 1960 and considered to be one of Arne Jacobsen’s most iconic projects, is a metallic, rectangular tower seemingly out of place, jutting out among the low-lying buildings of Copenhagen. This building is designed by Arne Jacobsen, one of the most prominent Danish designers from the 20th Century, known mostly for his distinctive chair designs. Although the hotel has changed throughout the past decades, it has still retained its modernist, retro aesthetic to this day. The hotel’s façade, in addition to the furniture of the hotel, were designed by Jacobsen. The famous Egg chairs and Swan chairs can be found in the lobby, and the spiral staircase on the ground floor has been preserved since the 60s. The only part of the hotel that has been unchanged and left in its original design is room 606, the hotel’s most popular room. The second floor of…